Archive for category Marijuana Use and Abuse

Beware of Marijuana Candy During Halloween Trick or Treat

Marijuana-infused candy definitely takes the cake as far as “trick or treat” is concerned.

Although the state of Colorado has pretty much embraced marijuana in its culture, the Denver Police Department recently issued a warning to parents about marijuana edibles disguised as candies for Halloween trick or treat. The police department released a video warning about Haloween marijuana edibles via YouTube:

Responsible owners of marijuana dispensaries support this campaign by Denver Police, stating the near-impossibility of identifying a marijuana candy from a regular sweet treat. “Once that candy dries, there’s really no way to tell the difference between candy that’s infused and candy that’s not infused,” according to marijuana retail owner Patrick Johnson as published in Time. “There’s really no way for a child or a parent or anybody, even an expert in the field, to tell you whether or not a product is infused or not.”

, , , , ,

No Comments

Drive High, Get A DUI: Colorado Releases Funny Marijuana Impaired Driving PSA

While marijuana is all the rage in Colorado, there’s nothing funny about being under the influence while driving.

That’s why the Department of Transportation in Colorado released a series of public service announcements (PSA) to highlight the adverse effects of driving while under the influence of marijuana. The videos are part of the campaign entitled “Drive High, Get A DUI,” which pokes fun at the real threat of marijuana-impaired driving.

Here’s a funny ad of a man mounting a TV on the wall while high on pot:

You can watch the two other PSAs here and here, both of which are humorous depictions of people high on marijuana but are advised not to drive.

Despite the legality of recreational marijuana in Colorado, the state upholds the safety of its citizens by reminding them of responsible use of marijuana, especially when driving.

, , ,

No Comments

Students Likely To Drop Out of School Due To Marijuana Use

If you are not yet startled by marijuana abuse by kids, this bit of news might shake your mindset and apathy.

legalize_marijuana_mainJust a few weeks after research by New York University revealed the effect of alcohol and marijuana on high school seniors, a recent study showed that teenagers have a 60 percent likelihood to drop out of school when they use marijuana on a daily basis. According to the University of South Wales National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre in Australia, the results of their study could be used as a framework to reconsider legalizing marijuana.

The study based its findings on three earlier researches covering about 3,700 individuals, and looked into the behaviors and academic achievements of the respondents in cross reference to their drug use until they reached 30 years of age.

Study lead author Dr. Edmund Silins emphasized the importance of their study to government decisions in marijuana legalization measures. “The findings are timely given movement in some states in the US and Latin America to decriminalise marijuana, and there is also a movement here in Australia to decriminalise and legalise the drug for medicinal use,” said Dr. Silins in a news release. “Because our study has shown the potential harms of adolescent use, particularly heavy use, policy makers must be aware of this and reform efforts should be carefully considered to protect against this.”

Aside from the scholastic effect of marijuana on teens, the illicit drug was also linked to higher tendency to commit suicide and try other illegal substances.

, , , , , , ,

No Comments

Study: Effects of Alcohol and Marijuana on High School Seniors

The ongoing quest to pull away teenagers and students from substance abuse has never waned. This new study emphasizes the ill effects of alcohol and marijuana on high school seniors.

high school kidsAccording to researchers from the Center for Drug Use and HIV Research of New York University, teenagers who are about to graduate from high school were engaged in drunk driving cases due to alcohol abuse. “Compared to non-drinkers, frequent drinkers were over 13 times more likely to report that their alcohol use has led to unsafe driving,” said Dr. Joseph Palamar of NYU Langone Medical Center.

Frequent drinking also led to damaged relationships and feelings of regret and emotional instability especially in women.

Meanwhile, marijuana was reported in previous studies to be a better alternative than taking alcohol, but the study revealed that it was no better. “Marijuana users, compared to non-users, were three times more likely to report unsafe driving as a direct result of use,” Dr. Palamar said in a news release. In addition, seniors who engaged in frequent marijuana use were more than 20 times likely to engage in police-related incidents.

The study involved data from close to 7,500 high school seniors who used alcohol and marijuana from 2007 to 2011.

, , , , ,

No Comments

Washington Medical Marijuana Policy Loophole: No Age Restriction?

Medical marijuana legalization has always been a trending topic, but how’s this for a hot bit of news: A news item recently exposed that the medical marijuana law in Washington has no age limit.

teen marijuanaAccording to Seattle’s KPLU, the state’s law on medical marijuana procurement does not include any age restrictions or parental supervision. According to Bellevue drug counselor Paul Weatherly, he regularly meets with teenagers exposed to marijuana. One time, one of the teens told him, “Oh, I can hardly wait until I’m 18 and I can get my medical marijuana card.” Weatherly was reminded that “when I read the law, I didn’t see any age restrictions.”

This loophole may be exploited by teenagers who want access to a lot of marijuana, as well as scheming medical professionals who want to earn more, albeit illegally. In fact, Weatherly said he was able to talk to a kid who got the go signal to purchase marijuana from a physician through Skype.

Meanwhile, Lisa Sharp, a manager for Seattle Public Schools’ prevention and intervention, said that may teenagers already have authorization for medical marijuana, and can even visit pot dispensaries to get their daily dose. The rise in marijuana use on and off-campus has been observed by school staff as well. “We are seeing it all over our city, so in middle schools and high schools and elementary schools,” said Sharp.

,

No Comments

Study: Medical Marijuana Laws Do Not Lead to Higher Teen Pot Use

Many parents are concerned about how legalizing the use and sale of marijuana may affect their children. Medical marijuana has been made legal in 21 states and the District of Columbia while recreational marijuana has been allowed for people who are at least 21 years old in Colorado and Washington.

medical marijuanaParents worry that their teenagers may have easier access to marijuana, which may increase the likelihood of today’s teens using them. This is a valid cause of concern, since teens are found to be using drugs at younger ages, when their bodies and brains are still on critical developmental stages.

A study that looked into 20 years of data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance Survey gives parents a reason to let out a small sigh of relief.

Researchers compared the data in states that have legalized medical marijuana and data in neighboring states that haven’t. The study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health, found that marijuana legalization for medical purposes does not result in greater use of marijuana by teens. “There were no statistically significant differences in marijuana use before and after policy change for any state pairing,” writes lead author Dr. Esther Choo.

It still is a popular illicit drug among U.S. kids, but its use has remained steady before and after a state legalized marijuana. The estimates are based on self-reports given by over 11 million students through anonymous surveys.

, ,

No Comments