Millions Spent on Alcohol-Related Accidents in Colleges


United States colleges are spending almost half a million dollars a year for alcohol-related accidents and blackouts that students get involved in.

Researchers from the University of Wisconsin-Madison have uncovered that more than 40,000 students become victims of injuries linked to alcohol use, thus a huge part of colleges’ budget is unnecessarily spent to address such incidents.

alcohol abuseThe study was done with 954 college students as subjects. The students were all heavy drinkers that 28 days before the study began, male participants consumed an average of 81.8 drinks while females drank an average of 58.7 drinks.

Results of the two-year research made yielded 30% of males and 27% of females figuring in emergency room admissions due to broken bones or brain and head injuries due to alcohol-linked accidents. It was also generalized that students who experience alcohol-induced blackouts were 70% more likely to be rushed into emergency rooms compared to those who did not have any blackout episodes despite drinking the same amount of alcoholic beverage.

Research authors Marlon Mundt and Larissa Zakletskaia from the department of family medicine in the above mentioned university agreed that college students who abuse alcohol often puts a toll on the medical care system of schools and the need for proper action to address the problem.

“Given limited campus resources, the study results support targeting efforts at preventing alcohol-related injury [among] students with a history of blackouts. In our cost estimate, close to a half-million dollars could be saved in emergency-department utilization costs on a large university campus each year if interventions targeting blackout sufferers were successful.”

The cost of emergency cases of students’ alcohol-related blackouts was at $469,000 to $546,000 per university.

College binge drinkers now reach 44%, and this figure could still increase with time.

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