Study: Children Unintentionally Take Wrong Medication

Errors are inevitable, but what will you do if the error involves giving your child the wrong medicine?

child wrong medicationA study from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital revealed that while parents and caregivers have the best of intentions, about 63,000 children below six years old have received the wrong medication from 2002 to 2012.

Dr. Huiyun Xiang, who works at the hospital’s Center for Pediatric Trauma Research, said that the figures in their study are still conservative. “The numbers we report still underestimate the true magnitude of these incidents since these are just cases reported to national poison centers,” said Xiang in a news release.

According to the study released via the online journal Pediatrics, the medication error happen in areas where children usually stay: the school, a friend’s house, or the child’s own home. Many of the reported cases involved unintentional ingestion of painkillers, acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Meanwhile, the error usually happens because the child receives the drug multiple times as a result of the caregiver’s error or memory failure. Other reasons include following an incorrect dosage or giving the child a wrong medicine for the ailment.

In addition, Xiang said that younger kids prove to be the most vulnerable in these cases. “We found that younger children are more apt to experience error than older children, with children under age one accounting for 25 percent of incidents,” Xiang added.

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Beware of Marijuana Candy During Halloween Trick or Treat

Marijuana-infused candy definitely takes the cake as far as “trick or treat” is concerned.

Although the state of Colorado has pretty much embraced marijuana in its culture, the Denver Police Department recently issued a warning to parents about marijuana edibles disguised as candies for Halloween trick or treat. The police department released a video warning about Haloween marijuana edibles via YouTube:

Responsible owners of marijuana dispensaries support this campaign by Denver Police, stating the near-impossibility of identifying a marijuana candy from a regular sweet treat. “Once that candy dries, there’s really no way to tell the difference between candy that’s infused and candy that’s not infused,” according to marijuana retail owner Patrick Johnson as published in Time. “There’s really no way for a child or a parent or anybody, even an expert in the field, to tell you whether or not a product is infused or not.”

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Teenage Moms Less Depressed and Drug-Dependent Through In-Home Sessions

Teenage pregnancy is a very difficult issue for the young moms, and it’s easy for them to succumb to depression and drug use. The good news is that with early and persistent intervention, the pregnant teen’s likelihood to be depressed and drug-dependent becomes lower.

pregnant teens interventionA study by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health revealed that pregnant teenagers who are exposed to in-home educational sessions are less likely to fall into behavioral issues, use illegal drugs, or become depressed. According to a news release, the study involved more than 300 American Indian pregnant teenagers who were assigned to either of two treatments: the standard care that includes medical checkups and childcare, or the same care but with an additional program of in-house sessions under the Family Spirit intervention. The study ran until the children reached age 3.

The teenage moms who underwent the Family Spirit program were found to have better dispositions than those who received standard care. In addition, their children were also observed to have better future behavioral patterns.

Dr. Allison Barlow, who is the lead author of the study and works at the school’s Center for American Indian Health, shared that the default mode of treatment for teenage pregnancy cases is inclined towards medical techniques, but the study proved that proper intervention works just as well, if not better. “Now the burden is in multi-generational behavioral health problems, the substance abuse, depression and domestic violence that are transferred from parents to children. This intervention can help us break that cycle of despair,” Barlow said.

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Drive High, Get A DUI: Colorado Releases Funny Marijuana Impaired Driving PSA

While marijuana is all the rage in Colorado, there’s nothing funny about being under the influence while driving.

That’s why the Department of Transportation in Colorado released a series of public service announcements (PSA) to highlight the adverse effects of driving while under the influence of marijuana. The videos are part of the campaign entitled “Drive High, Get A DUI,” which pokes fun at the real threat of marijuana-impaired driving.

Here’s a funny ad of a man mounting a TV on the wall while high on pot:

You can watch the two other PSAs here and here, both of which are humorous depictions of people high on marijuana but are advised not to drive.

Despite the legality of recreational marijuana in Colorado, the state upholds the safety of its citizens by reminding them of responsible use of marijuana, especially when driving.

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Cloud 9 Bath Salts Pose Real Threat On Teenagers

It sounds like a harmless product, but don’t let the heavenly name of Cloud 9 fool you.

Cloud 9 is a drug that is gaining popularity among teenagers. The product is actually bath salts mostly sold in liquid form for use in e-cigarettes. Much like any other bath salt product, Cloud 9 contains the active component methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a substance that has exceedingly higher hallucinogenic effects than meth or cocaine.

cloud 9 bath saltsThe liquid drug is easy to procure in some retail stores, but is usually purchased online fairly easily. This convenient access to Cloud 9 bath salt poses a real danger to the young generation, based on a report by Inquisitr about more than 20 teenagers hospitalized as a result of taking bath salts within this year.

The drug’s meteoric rise to infamy stems from the fact that aside from its availability, it can mimic the euphoric effects of popular illicit drugs such as coke, meth, LSD and ecstasy. Immediate health risks arising from use of Cloud 9 and other similar bath salts include high blood pressure, irritability, nausea, dizziness, faster heart rate, and delusions. Meanwhile, some of the long-term effects are depression, neglect of commitments, and violent tendencies.

Other names of bath salts aside from Cloud 9 include Bubbles, Hookah Relax, and Purple Wave. Many of these products are sealed in packages that circumvent existing drug prohibition laws by labeling the substance “not for human consumption.”

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Study: Exercise Linked To Increased Alcohol Intake

Physical activity has been regarded as one way to ensure a healthy body and lifestyle. However, a recent study revealed that a person who moves around more has a higher tendency to drink more.

exercise alcohol abuseThe study, conducted by Northwestern University proponents led by David E. Conroy, attempted to figure out a trend between physical activity and alcohol consumption. The analysis was done on respondents between the ages of 18 and 89 who were asked to record their level of physical movement and their alcohol behavior over three periods at 21 days each.

Results showed that people had the tendency to do more physical activity on days to the weekend, particularly Thursday to Sunday. It is also on these days that the amount of alcohol consumed was high. “Monday through Wednesday people batten down the hatches and they cut back on alcohol consumption… but once that ‘social weekend’ kicks off on Thursdays, physical activity increases and so does alcohol consumption,” said Conroy in a news item.

The researchers said that the link between exercise and alcohol intake is not a direct cause-and-effect relationship. In fact, they recommend further studies about this link. “We need to figure out how to use physical activity effectively and safely without having the adverse effects of drinking more alcohol,” Conroy added.

The study may confound exercise enthusiasts who find physical activity to be a healthy plan. In fact, exercise is recommended for teenagers to prevent potential drug abuse.

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